yasmaannodvijate loko lokaannodvijate cha yaha |
harshaamarshabhayodvegairmukto yaha sa cha me priyaha || 15 ||

 
By whom no one is agitated, and who is not agitated by anyone, who is free from excitement, irritation, fear and agitation, he is dear to me.
 
yasmaat : by whom
na : not
udvijate : agitated
lokaha : any one
lokaat : by any one
na : not
udvijate : agitated
cha : and
yaha : who
harshaamarshabhayodvegaihi : excitement, irritation, fear, agitation
muktaha : free from
yaha : who
saha : he
cha : and
me : to me
priyaha : dear
 
Wikipedia defines a “roast” as follows: A roast is an event, almost exclusively in the United States, in which an individual is subjected to a public presentation of comedic insults, praise, outlandish true and untrue stories, and heartwarming tributes, the implication being that the roastee is able to take the jokes in good humor and not as serious criticism or insult, and therefore, show their good nature. It is seen by some as a great honour to be roasted, as the individual is surrounded by friends, fans, and well-wishers, who can receive some of the same treatment as well during the course of the evening. The party and presentation itself are both referred to as a roast.
 
In our life, when we are dealing with other people, it is inevitable that we will experience a whole host of emotional reactions to what those people say to us. Four common reactions are excitement on hearing something pleasant, irritation on hearing something unpleasant, fear on hearing something worrisome, and agitation when meeting someone that has the upper hand in the conversation. But in a “roast”, the individual happily accepts all sorts of abuses and insults, because he knows that they are coming from his friends and well-wishers, people that he knows as his own, not separate from him. At the end of the roast, the individual in turn insults and abuses the people that insulted him earlier, and no one feels any ill-will towards him for the same reasons.
 
Similarly, the devotee who considers everyone and everything as the play of Ishvara, including himself, has no reason to take anything personally. His sense of self is not the small ego that most of us consider as our “I”. He has identified with Ishvara who runs multitudes of universes. Any sort of insult, agitation or fear dissipates instantly because he views the insult, the insulter and the recipient of the insult as Ishvara. He thinks of it as a play where his friends are the actors and directors. Shri Krishna says that such a person who is free from agitations, and who does not agitate any one else, is dear to him.

Advertisements